FOREWORD

FOREWORD1995

On July 4, 1995, American astronauts and Russian cosmonauts concluded five days of join orbital research in their linked spacecraft. The rendezvous and docking of the Space Shuttle Atlantis and the Mir space station was a historic mission, the beginning of a new era of expanded international cooperation. These 100 flights, over 34 years, have provided a solid foundation of experience and technology for the next major step in human space activity, the assembly and operation of the International Space Station. The Space Station is vital to the future of space research, but its importance goes well beyond that: It is a facility where scientists can take advantage of the microgravity environment to conduct experiments that promise dramatic advances in materials and medications used on Earth for combating intractable diseases.

The International Space Station, with the partnership of Canada, Europe, Japan, Russia, and the United State, represents only one segment of NASA's comprehensive program of research. We are engaged in a broad space science effort that will provide vast new knowledge about the universe and Earth's place in it. That knowledge is immensely valuable in its own right and creates a foundation to provide for tomorrow's practical applications.

We are continuing our Mission to Planet Earth, which seeks greater understanding of the complex mechanisms that control our planet's behavior and application of that knowledge for the benefit of all on Earth.

We are developing cutting-edge aeronautical technologies with our partners in government, industry, and academia that will help elevate the competitive capability of the U.S. aeronautics industries and contribute to development of safer, more efficient, and more environmentally compatible aircraft, while developing the advanced technologies for a High Speed Civil Transport, reducing air traffic delays, enhancing e safety and effectiveness of the national airspace system, and revitalizing the general aviation industry.

While pursuing these multiple responsibilities, we are also conducting a revolutionary restructuring of NASA's organization and operations designed to effect large-scale economies. We are adapting to the realities of the times and making fundamental changes in our methods, workforce, facilities, and relationships with contractors - everything that promises reduced outlays without significant loss of capability.

There will, however, be no change in the vision with which we establish goals nor the dedication with which we pursue them. I am confident that, with the support of the American people, we can meet the challenge of doing more with less, and that we can carry out an effective program that will ensure continued U.S. leadership in aeronautical and space research.

Daniel S. Goldin

Administrator

National Aeronautics and Space Administration


SPINOFF 1995 TABLE OF CONTENTS


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