[Senator E.J. 
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National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center
Houston, Texas 77058

Biographical Data



NAME: Senator E.J. "Jake" Garn
NASA Payload Specialist STS-51D

PERSONAL DATA:

PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION:

EDUCATION:
Senator Garn is a graduate of the University of Utah.

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SPECIAL HONORS:
Garn was awarded the Wright Brothers Memorial Trophy, an aviation award.

EXPERIENCE:
He was a private pilot, then a Navy pilot on active duty for four years. Senator Garn piloted the T-34 SNJ, T-28 SNB, S-2F PMB and P-2V7, flying reconnaissance missions over the Sea of Japan. Then when he returned to Utah, there was no Naval Air Reserve. Because his love for flying was greater than his loyalty to the Navy, he transferred over to the Air Guard. He flew for nearly 20 years and retired as a full colonel. Garn was elected to the US Senate from Utah in 1974.

NASA EXPERIENCE:
In November 1984, Senator Garn was invited by NASA to fly as a payload specialist on the space shuttle Discovery Mission STS-51-D. During the seven-day flight, he performed various medical tests. E.J. "Jake" Garn, a U.S. Senator from Utah, was the first public official to fly aboard the Space Shuttle. Garn was onboard as a Congressional observer. 51-D launched April 12 and was the fourth flight of Discovery (OV-103). The launch was from KSC and the landing was at KS on Runway 33, the nineteenth of April 1985. The mission lasted 144 hours (6 days), 23 hours, 55 minutes, 23 seconds

Garn completed payload specialist training to carry out numerous medical physiological tests and measurements designed to detect and record changes the body undergoes in weightlessness.

CURRENT ASSIGNMENT:
Garn is now retired from the Senate and often speaks to various groups. He tells of his spaceflight experience with audiences in his "Perspective from Space" address. He also shares, "It was his experience in space that gave him a new outlook on life."

ARCHIVAL BIOGRAPHY LAST UPDATED 1999


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